User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 34

  1. #21
    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    2,591

    Default

    Still not sold on the whole college experience. I went, but most of the general studies and business crap went out the door as soon as the class ended, and has not reappeared now 10 years removed from university. My major classes are the only things that continue to stick. I mean, the socializing was cool, but it's really overblown. I think college sets up some for success; some for failure. It's not for everyone; it's a shame society's set up where most jobs require it.

  2. #22
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    I agree with what most have said already; most of your criticisms of community college apply equally to universities. The only thing I've seen or heard of that is substantially different (and better) is if you find one of those small, private liberal arts colleges that bases their curriculum on small-classroom discussion (and I mean bases, not the cheap substitute that you get when you're required to attend discussions as a supplement to large lecture courses.) The problem is that those usually cost a lot more and they won't fulfill your needs if you want to study something business-related.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  3. #23
    Self sustaining supernova Zoom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    1,065

    Default

    I went to community college instead of high school (for the second half, as it is). What distinctly seemed to separate where I went then and the university I attend now is that the focus was more on learning than research. The classes were more interactive, and while they were at a slightly lower level intellectually speaking I got more out of them because of the atmosphere they fostered. I also liked that most of my classes were a mixture of older and younger adults - a more varied pool of perspectives to draw from when discussions came up.

    This was with me being a lover of learning and talking more to my professors than other students, however. I put quite a bit of myself into it.

  4. #24
    mrs disregard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    7,855

    Default

    I loved community college. It was cheap and I got a degree out of it. I went to a very small one so the classes were small and intimate. I enjoyed the courses, but I'm an eager student in general.

    Now I'm back in cc to get my pre reqs for nursing school. Glad to be back.

    But I do think that if you have a particular area of study you wish to really excel in, you have to go beyond cc. It's merely a springboard.

  5. #25
    Senior Member sculpting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,226

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallulah View Post
    I teach at a community college, but I teach freshman-level classes, so I can't speak to the rest of it. I personally feel that at my school, we coddle the students too much--teachers are expected by administration to meet the students more than halfway. I feel like they're kind of wanting us to be high school teachers, and we, the teachers, would much rather treat them like adults. Coddling students fosters a sense of entitlement and irresponsibility, from my experience. It's frustrating.
    I did my first two years at a junior college and this seems to be very true. The coursework uses the same texts and material, but the rigor and expectations around learning differ a great deal. I didnt have to study at all in the junior college, so my first semester at uni I made two Cs. After my biochem prof telling me I should major in business, I got really pissed off and learned to study.

    I think junior colleges are actually really awesome for coursework outside of one's major however but if you plan to major in a subject it would be best to take entry level course at the uni as they will likely be much more challenging. Junior colleges are also great if you dont know what you want to major in yet but want to get some coursework out of the way.

  6. #26
    Senior Member avolkiteshvara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    YaYa
    Posts
    895

    Default

    I think its on par with University. The classes are dumbed down for the divorced middleaged housewife. But you can get more time with teachers. You aren't being taught by someone who is struggling to cram a full teaching load as well as their own grad work. Its what you make of it.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Greta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    MBTI
    INTe
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by avolkiteshvara View Post
    I think its on par with University. The classes are dumbed down for the divorced middleaged housewife. But you can get more time with teachers..
    or dumbed down for the newly- (or not so newly-) unemployed middle-aged failure of a man?

  8. #28
    i love skylights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 so/sx
    Socionics
    EII Ne
    Posts
    7,835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CzeCze View Post
    I would say there are pros and cons of community college. The pros are that it can be much cheaper than a traditional college and can offer great pre/professional training. The cons are that the standards for traditional education (english, biology, etc.) are generally not as high or stringent.

    Community college is really a mixed bag, I think you really get out of it what you put in and its best use is for working adults going into second or third careers (pre/professional training), people taking classes for recreation, and for trad college aged students who lack the funds or are otherwise not ready for traditional college.
    my mom has taken continuing education classes at a local community college for years, and she really loves it. she's also taken a few spanish and ASL classes recently. it's great because they have classes at night and on weekends so that she could easily fit it into her schedule, and their classes are tailored to what she needs - not an all-encompassing education, but information on a specific topic.

    however, i never considered community college as an immediate avenue for myself. i knew coming out of high school that i wanted to attend a 4-year college or university, preferably liberal arts. i wanted the whole "college experience", dorms, meal plan, greek life and all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Takeru View Post
    Though I think having fun at college is the best thing you can do, especially if your the type of person that stresses and study like crazy.
    agreed. have fun and try to open yourself to new things. make the most of every service available to you, especially the free ones, like the gym, pool, library, computer labs, printers, essentially free 1-credit courses, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Orangey View Post
    I agree with what most have said already; most of your criticisms of community college apply equally to universities. The only thing I've seen or heard of that is substantially different (and better) is if you find one of those small, private liberal arts colleges that bases their curriculum on small-classroom discussion (and I mean bases, not the cheap substitute that you get when you're required to attend discussions as a supplement to large lecture courses.) The problem is that those usually cost a lot more and they won't fulfill your needs if you want to study something business-related.
    yes. i was lucky to be able to go to a small public liberal arts college (average class size under 20), which cost as much over 4 years as some of my friends have paid for a single year. we had a very complex set of non-major requirements designed to make us well-rounded students. in my opinion, my whole college experience was quite wonderful. essentially we went from freshman discussion classes to fulfilling our liberal arts requirements in fairly small (20-25 people) classes, then into early major classes (the largest class sizes, usually around 30 but peaked at 90 for intro sciences), then by advanced major classes you likely had several classes with just 8 or 9 people in them. many other programs, minors, study abroad, honors, and plenty of student organizations were strongly promoted as well. my life at college was very full of doing and very full of thinking, and i think that's what made it such a good experience. i was being challenged but also felt very supported, and i was very involved in the campus life. school was a very cohesive thing for me - a sort of safe h(e)aven - and i miss it very much. i'm in the process of applying for more school again!

    but then, i just kind of love school in general, so i'm biased. :blushing:

    the students who did not appreciate my school as much as i did were those who knew EXACTLY what they wanted to do and who did not want to study anything else - they got sick of the varied requirements - and those who really would have preferred to be more anonymous in class! admittedly, sometimes i really wished i could have slept in the back more often, lol.

  9. #29
    Une Femme est une femme paperoceans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    8w7
    Posts
    834

    Default

    -It's major program is ridiculous; I majored in philosophy; I took a grand total of five actual philosophy courses (24 classes total).
    That usually happens during the first two years of college.

    -It was required of me to take math, science, writing, and other classes. Why though so many? I'm majoring in philosophy there was no reason I needed to take courses in biology, geology, etc.
    Everyone has to take general courses--university students included.

    -The courses are far too short and all of them are treated like intro level courses.
    Well, since it's the first two years of college they would be intro courses...

    -Most textbooks are often those expensive 500 pg. intro level texts, that are written in the most simplistic manner possible yet somehow take hourse to read through. (except for the philosophy books, they were dirt cheap and took minutes to read).
    They do the same in universities. I do not see where you're going with this.
    Between that cigarillo and sticking my finger down my throat to see if I could DT, I feel like puking RN.

    Read my Blog.

  10. #30
    ReflecTcelfeR
    Guest

    Default

    Mine is essentially 13th grade.

Similar Threads

  1. A critique of religion.
    By xisnotx in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-28-2011, 07:26 PM
  2. Thinking of quitting college
    By Queen Kat in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 82
    Last Post: 11-28-2010, 11:17 PM
  3. Critique of the concept of "Fanaticism" (article)
    By tcda in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-03-2010, 07:08 PM
  4. Critique of "Positive Thinking"
    By tcda in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 06-22-2010, 03:35 PM
  5. Critique of employment system.
    By Athenian200 in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 08-04-2009, 08:08 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO