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  1. #11
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    ^ have you found or seen other medical jobs that you think would be better suited for INFP's??? Virtually everything I see needs some darned accredidation or other

  2. #12
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    LOL, I was a blood collector for a while, which was even worse. I liked talking to the patients though. Unfortantly the medical industry being what it is, they like to see formal education, and those precious bits of paper. It only seems to get worse as the years pass.
    Damn, I was thinking about Psych too. Obviously the lab components wouldn't bother me too much though.
    The best kind of job is one that isn't so rigidly structured, where some one isn't looking over my shoulder all the time, and I get to use my brain. I can't see any thing like that in medicine until you get to middle managment. Research labs tend be less rigid IMHO.
    I worked as a nurses aid when I was younger which is fun if the nurses don't treat you like a shit kicker.(I was more like a paid visitor though). I always thought being an orderly would be fun too, but it doesn't seem to be an option for me because I'm small and it can involve heavy lifting.

    I think I would find my job less ardous, if my skills and inherent abilities were acknowledged as good, not some thing to be inherently suspicous of, because for all I bitch about my career, I'm very good at it. Better at it than many ST's, in fact. I learn fast, my intuitiveness is a blessing, I can concentrate for longer, being able to see the bigger picture has been a real asset. Questioning policies if they don't make sense, being able to get the best out of team members...trust me that has saved my ass time and time again. If I have a small team, I work at group cohesion. You can get more out of team members if you inspire loyalty, and just plain old fashion caring. It's good to know some one has your back in crisis.
    This can often be seen as insubordination though, if team members display more loyalty to you than managment (it's happened to me). Oh, and my sheer capacity for remembering odd minutea....and weird little tricks and quirks.
    Most intuitives I have crossed paths with (I'm sure it's not just an INFP thing) struggle with the mind numbing focus on the details. Medical labs are geared up for and cater to sensors, right down to the ridiculous route training, and assumption that each lab is very different ( ican tell you for a fact once you've work in a few labs, you can pretty much walk into any lab and run it.)
    Last edited by CrystalViolet; 05-15-2010 at 11:01 PM. Reason: More thoughts
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    ^ I have this silly idea that since I have a MS in physics, and work with technical equipment including lasers, that *maybe* there would be some easy way to shift over...

  4. #14
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    I think we'd be good at things like recreational therapist, jobs that require a little human touch. Social worker, any thing requiring patient contact so long as it's not too much and we can bail for a bit if we need too. I think I'd make a good ward clerk, sounds boring but they get around and they deal with every body, lots of little tasks, the super trouble shooters. INFP's get bitter and cynical in the medical industry, for we get shunned for the very things that are our strengths, and many would consider an asset on the outside.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
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  5. #15
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott N Denver View Post
    ^ I have this silly idea that since I have a MS in physics, and work with technical equipment including lasers, that *maybe* there would be some easy way to shift over...
    LOL, IMHO, that would be considered an assett. I love it when people aren't scared of the analysers, and aren't afraid to pull them apart, but alas the buearocrats don't see it that way, but I don't see why you couldn't approach companies like coulter, or bayer....they always seem to be looking for techies for machine maintanance.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

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  6. #16
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireyPheonix View Post
    INFP's get bitter and cynical in the medical industry, for we get shunned for the very things that are our strengths, and many would consider an asset on the outside.
    Can you expand some more on this, both the first part and the second? Is the second part saying "our peers say we care too much and shun us for that, even though people think people in the medical field should care"???

    Other than not wanting to go back to school, I keep thinking about physical therapist, or MRI tech, or maybe medical sonographer

  7. #17
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott N Denver View Post
    Can you expand some more on this, both the first part and the second? Is the second part saying "our peers say we care too much and shun us for that, even though people think people in the medical field should care"???

    Other than not wanting to go back to school, I keep thinking about physical therapist, or MRI tech, or maybe medical sonographer
    Yeah, some thing like that. My idealism is some what of a bane.
    Oooo, MRI tech. Psyichal therapist could work. Generally a hard course to get into though. Medical sonographer....lots of pregnant women.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott N Denver View Post
    Can you expand some more on this, both the first part and the second? Is the second part saying "our peers say we care too much and shun us for that, even though people think people in the medical field should care"???

    Other than not wanting to go back to school, I keep thinking about physical therapist, or MRI tech, or maybe medical sonographer



    Quote Originally Posted by FireyPheonix View Post
    Yeah, some thing like that. My idealism is some what of a bane.
    Oooo, MRI tech. Psyichal therapist could work. Generally a hard course to get into though. Medical sonographer....lots of pregnant women.
    Here is the thing. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy can be a good place, if you can jump all the hurdles to get in.

    I'm more familiar with OT, so I will generally stick with OT info.

    There are 2 levels. Occupational Therapy Assistant: a 2 year Associate's Degree.

    And Occupational Therapist: a Masters degree/Doctorate. There are no 4 year degrees for OT. It was phased out in the early 2000's if I remember correctly.

    Don't have any financial problems, they frown on that.

    OTAs cannot work without being supervised by an OT, better to get a Masters. You must take National or State boards($400+), sometimes both, to be licensed. As an OTA you don't have much room to be creative, as an OT you can be creative as long as you stay within budget, and can show objective evidence of progress in patients.

    Paperwork sucks. Every time you see a patient you need to be able to show and document, concrete, objective, evidence that the treatment addresses the patient's problem(s). In such a way that the medical billing weenies, and insurance company flunkies, will pay for it.

    It can be difficult to justify getting paid for adjusting a patient's posture in a wheelchair, so that they no longer choke when they eat. Then documenting it in such a way that you get paid. When an alert Nurse's Aide could have done the same thing, for $15 an hour.

    P.S. Males have an easier time getting into OT and PT, more so OT. Since there is a shortage of men in those fields.


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  9. #19
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    ^ can someone explain how PT and OT differ? As I understand OT is much more broad

  10. #20
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    A decent description.


    Occupational Therapy

    Occupational therapy is meant to focus on a person’s functional abilities. An occupational therapist does not directly treat a person’s injury, but instead helps the person optimize their independence and ability to accomplish daily activities after an injury has occurred. Occupational therapy focuses on a patient’s life skills.

    An occupational therapist will utilize adaptive tools that are ofttimes customized by the therapist. They will also do on-site assessments in home and work environments and give recommendations on how the locations can be adapted to allow a better quality of life. Think about them as “occupation” like a job, a therapist that works on a job or home site.

    Physical Therapy

    Physical therapy is focused more on treating an injury than working around it or trying to prevent future injuries. Think of them as more “physical” or therapists of the body instead of the occupation/job or home environment.

    Physical therapists are trained on anatomy and the musculoskeletal systems, resulting in the therapist being more knowledgeable about muscle and skeletal injuries. They are specialized in rehabilitation, offering services to injured patients that may not be available through a general practitioner.
    From here:
    The Difference Between Physical and Occupational Therapy | Degrees In Health Care

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