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  1. #21
    Probably Most Brilliant Craft's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Of-Despair View Post
    how are they not verifyable?
    I don't know any "Business Leaders"..actually I know one but he's no physicist.

    How are examples on a forum not verifiable? Well...

  2. #22
    Ruler of the Stars Asterion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    I don't know any "Business Leaders"..actually I know one but he's no physicist.

    How are examples on a forum not verifiable? Well...
    I thought you were getting at that, wasn't too sure, anyway, I'll ask a couple of physics professors and they'll tell me and I'll get back here and tell you. But knowing you, that wouldn't be enough, so I'll just do nothing
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  3. #23
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Yes, Physics and business oddly seem to go together, but there are some caveats. HR people are stupid: they'll read a resume, wonder what Ph.D. in Physics has to do with designing a functional product, and toss it in the circular file. In general, I've been hired into my "good" jobs because an engineer reviewed my resume and recognized the problem-solving abilities.

    There is a demand for "smart people" in business. It's not extremely common, but common enough to keep ex-physicists employed. As noted in prior posts, it's the problem-solving abilities: here's some weird abstract info/data- tell me what I need to do.

    I find that I use my physics-modeling abilities in my work all the time. In my personal case it is creating database plus software behavior to handle business processes. Everyone thinks it's simple and straightforward, but it really isn't. Once you get more than a dozen ideas all working in the same model, the interactions become far more complicated than most people bargain for. Very often, I demonstrate that I can offer 90-95% of what they want to have work very quickly, while the last 5% can take months/years due to the "have your cake and eat it, too" nature of many business requests.

    The main difference is that instead of figuring out how black holes work, I'm figuring out how payroll and billing "ought to work." It's a different kind of black hole, but no less complicated and difficult in spite of its being rather mundane.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  4. #24
    Ruler of the Stars Asterion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Yes, Physics and business oddly seem to go together, but there are some caveats. HR people are stupid: they'll read a resume, wonder what Ph.D. in Physics has to do with designing a functional product, and toss it in the circular file. In general, I've been hired into my "good" jobs because an engineer reviewed my resume and recognized the problem-solving abilities.

    There is a demand for "smart people" in business. It's not extremely common, but common enough to keep ex-physicists employed. As noted in prior posts, it's the problem-solving abilities: here's some weird abstract info/data- tell me what I need to do.

    I find that I use my physics-modeling abilities in my work all the time. In my personal case it is creating database plus software behavior to handle business processes. Everyone thinks it's simple and straightforward, but it really isn't. Once you get more than a dozen ideas all working in the same model, the interactions become far more complicated than most people bargain for. Very often, I demonstrate that I can offer 90-95% of what they want to have work very quickly, while the last 5% can take months/years due to the "have your cake and eat it, too" nature of many business requests.

    The main difference is that instead of figuring out how black holes work, I'm figuring out how payroll and billing "ought to work." It's a different kind of black hole, but no less complicated and difficult in spite of its being rather mundane.
    I've actually seen a poster made by sub-atomic physicists that used physics to model expected trends in stocks and all sorts of other business stuff. It was rather surprising that they could plot a function of something seemingly subjective using physics principles.

    Here's the trick though, physics is the study of the way nature itself works. Like you said, a physicist might study black holes. It's the pure mathematical ability that comes with physics that makes them able to become useful in a variety of different areas. From experience, I've found that mathematics majors are pretty rare, most people that actually study maths only do it so that they can then take on physics. So really, the pure mathematics majors are probably even more capable of this than physicists.
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  5. #25
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    physics teaches someone to solve problems by assessing value factors and leveraging mathematical principles for specific application, math by itself has little value... physics as a major is pretty specific but the skills are so fundamental that I imagine they could drive success in quite a few things, business being the most lucrative of course.

  6. #26
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Of-Despair View Post
    I've actually seen a poster made by sub-atomic physicists that used physics to model expected trends in stocks and all sorts of other business stuff. It was rather surprising that they could plot a function of something seemingly subjective using physics principles.
    Except for the part where computer models are mostly BS. Lots of investment firms try this. The strategies aren't noticeably better, from what I've read.

    Here's the trick though, physics is the study of the way nature itself works. Like you said, a physicist might study black holes. It's the pure mathematical ability that comes with physics that makes them able to become useful in a variety of different areas. From experience, I've found that mathematics majors are pretty rare, most people that actually study maths only do it so that they can then take on physics. So really, the pure mathematics majors are probably even more capable of this than physicists.
    Sort of.

    Remember "word problems"? The problems where you take real world situations and turn them into math, and then solve?

    Physics is the major that is best-suited to solving "word problems."

    Math, especially high-end pure math, is extremely abstract, and not well-suited to the "word problems" of business.

    You see a physicist doing/learning some very advanced math, and you ask him what it's for, and he can say, "Oh, this describes black holes." or "Oh, this describes how currents flow in solid-state circuitry."

    Ask a mathematician what his math is for, and he'll say, "For understanding math better." [The statement has been translated into English for non-math majors.]

    Business needs to solve word problems, not to understand business problems better, if you see what I mean?

    [That said, math majors are recruited just as strongly as physics majors, by interested enterprises: they filter out the overly-abstract people in their own ways.]
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  7. #27
    Per Ardua Metamorphosis's Avatar
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    Is there anything physics doesn't go well with? No, probably not.
    "You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit."

    Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office
    than to serve and obey them. - David Hume

  8. #28
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphosis View Post
    Is there anything physics doesn't go well with? No, probably not.
    Fashion.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  9. #29
    Per Ardua Metamorphosis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Fashion.
    Good point.

    Is there anything important that physics doesn't go well with? No, probably not.
    "You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit."

    Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office
    than to serve and obey them. - David Hume

  10. #30
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphosis View Post
    Is there anything physics doesn't go well with? No, probably not.
    communication skills
    PR
    giving a shit about other people
    recognizing and dealing with people's feeling
    human factors
    leadership
    managerial talent
    getting employed by engineering companies
    people knowing or understanding what you are talking about
    people liking you
    people inviting you to their hot happening parties
    socializing
    getting out of a dark cramped lab down in the basement that people avoid
    probably going to the gym
    .
    .
    .


    psychology
    sociology
    maybe philosophy???
    business
    criminal justice???
    english literature
    any literature for that matter
    I would say math personally, at least the high level [grad school] abstract stuff

    I met plenty of people studying physics while also studying it myself, as you can plainly see my opinions aren't very complimentary

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