User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 42

  1. #11
    morose bourgeoisie
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,859

    Default

    Thank you.

    Don't forget that many universities have adopted a highly market-driven perspective on the value of educaton, that is in line with the expectation of the general populace. a college education is considered a rough proxy to attending a trade school in this era. How many people graduate with a degree in, say business, with virtually no concept of what is meant by the term 'liberal arts education'? why is the uni just another form of technical school?

    The divide is not between society and the university (which I consider a red herring designed for political gain), but between the older, more idealistic (and more elitist) segment of the campus, and the more pragmatic side.

  2. #12
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nebbykoo View Post
    Thank you.

    Don't forget that many universities have adopted a highly market-driven perspective on the value of educaton, that is in line with the expectation of the general populace. a college education is considered a rough proxy to attending a trade school in this era. How many people graduate with a degree in, say business, with virtually no concept of what is meant by the term 'liberal arts education'? why is the uni just another form of technical school?

    The divide is not between society and the university (which I consider a red herring designed for political gain), but between the older, more idealistic (and more elitist) segment of the campus, and the more pragmatic side.
    I don't think that there is a divide between the university and the pulbic, but the university officials would like to believe that there is. That way they can avoid responsiblity to the society by and large and merely use them as a financial resource that they need in order to create a community in which they don't have to answer to the society by and large.

    Yes, universities have adjusted to the business demands of the public, I have mentioned that in my paper, though not in the summary. They noticed that people are generally not interested in learning and created a curriculum where they could pass just by thoughtlessly following instructions. Creating a non-educative curriculum is more lucrative than teaching courses where people are genuinely forced to learn.

    Although getting a degree from a university is not nearly as helpful to an average person's career, they propagate the message that it is extremely helpful. Similarly, the university degree is not at all educative, yet nonetheless it is within the best interests of the universities to lead the public to believe that their courses are not only of instrumental value but also are the path to true wisdom!
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  3. #13
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Socionics
    ENTj
    Posts
    5,908

    Default

    A good thing about Universities is their libraries. I don't know how's the situation in the average university, but over here the libraries are immense, you can find almost every book you need (well, unless it's just come out).
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  4. #14
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    A good thing about Universities is their libraries. I don't know how's the situation in the average university, but over here the libraries are immense, you can find almost every book you need (well, unless it's just come out).
    The University that I've attended also had a very large library. Just a few weeks before my graduation I had to return over 100 books. Today, I am fortunate enough to have clients who give me access to their online university library accounts.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  5. #15
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    xNFP
    Posts
    6,885

    Default

    I. Introduction

    In general, I believe you present a cogent argument regarding the American school system and its culture. Aside from some minor issues, your essay is nearly flawless and does not contain that pedantic style that so characterized your initial writing on this forum. It is very insightful, and it was really an enjoyable read.

    There are several inherent problems with the American system that you did not address, and I would like to address them in this little tidbit.

    To give you the background on my insights, please allow me to quickly state my limited experience with academia and teaching. Since I was born and raised in the United States, where I attended both school and university, I think I can comment on the American school system. After moving to Germany over five years ago, my professional experience has been nearly solely based in teaching, where I have taught pupils, students, and professionals from several backgrounds. Recently, I have also taught language courses to graduate and undergraduate students in Germany. Although I do not have an academic title, I do have (limited) experience in the field.

    II. Higher education or low-wage job?

    One problem in the American school system is the nearly compulsory nature of university education. What students are paying for, in essence, is a chance at a decent living standard - nothing more.

    Check your newspapers. Is it easy to find jobs that do NOT require a university degree? Basically, our teachers presented our future possibilities as follows: get a university degree, or you are screwed because you are not going to hold a candle to the MILLIONS OF OTHER PEOPLE out there getting a B.A., even if you are bright. (There are obvious exceptions; however, I think you know what I mean).

    In fact, once we started university, the outlook seemed even more grim: since so many people are competing for so few jobs, you have to get a MASTER'S or a PH.D, or you won't hold a candle to the MILLIONS OF OTHER PEOPLE getting these academic titles. Great.

    What are they going to tell us when we get a Ph.D.? You're screwed if you don't get a double or triple doctorate? Waitresses must get a professorship to have a shot at a job? What the hell?

    In contrast, Germans have several alternatives to academia, which allows individuals with other interests and inclinations to congregate there. Although we are sadly also adopting the American trend towards university education for all, usually unsuitable students do indeed drop out rather than clogging the works because there are VIABLE alternatives. (FH, VHS, BK, IHK, etc.)

    III. The issue of funding

    Meanwhile, in America people - also those who really should not be in academia - invest thousands and thousands of dollars in a worthless education that is so valuable (!) - what a paradox. One should also note that this education is not even compatible with other educational systems in other countries. That means you can invest $50,000 in your education, move to Europe, and they don't even know what the hell prestigious university you attended, and they sure as hell will not accept your degree. Super.

    Even worse, most people do not have the money to attend university, which forces students with limited funding to cater to the system or get poor grades, as a scholarship is the only means of entry. This fact leads most students (and people entering academia) to pander to conventional wisdom and not think outside the box.

    Most people still do not have all the funding they need to attend, and they take out huge amounts of loans to gain access to this worthlessly valuable education. This debt results in a nationwide populace that is not on stable financial footing - imagine, there are 22-year-olds who are already $60,000 in debt or MORE. And they do not even have car payments or a mortgage yet, assuming they do not have credit card debt up the ying-yang.

    The fact of the matter is: The government/state and financial institutions have you by the balls crying "MOMMY" before you even get a job. That makes for pretty compliant workers and citizens, now, doesn't it?

    All this aggravation, and you have not been even promised a job!!! But woe to he who decides to circumvent the system and go another route - he will surely not get a job at all!

    However, in Germany universities are indeed supported by the state, which means they do not have to pander to the needs of the 'plebeians', as you refer to them. Therefore, German universities have the freedom and funding to engage in other methods (whether or not they DO is another question, and German universities have their own issues I will address later.)

    Because German education is funded by the state, it is nearly free of charge. Although you would expect universities would swarm with plebeians who are idiotic, this trend generally only happens within the first year or two of higher education and becomes less prevalent. One issue I will concede is that the universities are filled with students who take forever FINISH university. Nonetheless, students typically realize that holding themselves to rigid standards of scholarship proves difficult and move to other areas (since there are other possibilities).

    IV. Bureaucracy and standards

    However, German education has its own aggravating tendencies. I really do not know why educators lack passion in what they do - it seems that on all levels of the education system in Germany, people do not give a fat rat's ass one way or the other about their students. They abide by rules. Regulations. Nonsense.

    Thankfully at university, this habit mellows out, and people love what they do a great deal more, which is why I love teaching at university a great deal more than grades 5-13. You meet really wonderful colleagues who engage in exchange of ideas and the like. The students are really engaged and work with you. If you give them the freedom, they will explore and delve more deeply into matters.

    However, they are very strict with standards. No stamp, no go. Same with employers. No stamp? No degree? No job. You cannot do it. ARGH. Drives me bat-shit crazy. "You haven't studied English? Well then - you cannot teach English! Oh, you're a native speaker? Well, that's interesting, but you still cannot teach English! You have five years of experience teaching pupils, students, professionals from many different backgrounds? That's nice, you STILL CAN'T TEACH ENGLISH." This pedantic regimentation is extremely frustrating.

    In America, you at least have the option of getting jobs if you have a great deal of provable knowledge and experience - meaning as long as you do your job well, it does not matter if you have a certain stamp or not, contrary to what these pedantic academics want you to believe. Bosses want to know: CAN YOU DO THE JOB OR NOT? And if you are a kid who needs a wet nurse but has a Ph.D., you still will not hold a candle to the dude with real experience who knows what the hell he is doing.

    However, this freedom apparent in the American system IS DYING due to high competition for limited jobs. Nowadays, people swarm universities, flying on the magic carpet of debt, because they have no shot in hell of getting a job in the current labor market. So at the moment America is predicated on the necessity to obtain a university degree to EVEN HAVE A SHOT at decent jobs. This requirement makes no sense, particularly for jobs that do not really have implications that require higher education. In essence, this tendency renders the value of education to practically nil, although students pay a great deal of money. Therefore, this 'FREEDOM' in the American system necessitates a good, stable economy, or the whole thing falls apart.

    So when the American system works, I do like its relative freedom. As much as SolitaryWalker criticizes its bureaucracy (which is surely apparent) or its lack of originality and unconventionality (which is also a fact), it does not even come CLOSE to the bureaucracy and the regimentation we see in the GERMAN system. On the other hand, even though the standards are more regimented, there appears to be a greater freedom of thought in the German system.

    V. Educators' motivation

    One HUGE - and I mean HUGE - objection I have to SolitaryWalker's argument (although granted, he did indeed mention that he was not making a blanket statement) constitutes the idea that educators and academics do not care about their students.

    What...the...hell?

    Well, I cannot speak for other idiotic morons that might be teachers, and granted there are a hell of a lot of people who couldn't give a rat's gas-expelling behind whether or not their students succeed.

    However, I have to say that I really do indeed genuinely care about my students and their success. In fact, I engage in a great deal more work than is required from me because I am so personally engaged. A good lesson makes me feel like I can reach to the skies; a poor lesson makes me grumpy the whole day, wallowing in my thoughts and analyzing what went wrong. Happy students make my heart sing; discontented students make my soul sink.

    Yes, indeed, we university educators (I am not a professor, simply a teacher there) do have to 'entertain' students as well insofar as we have to REACH them. When you have a bland subject like academic writing, you need to make it palatable to people, or they will zone out.

    However, I would not say I am a regimented teacher who does not accept things out of the norm; in fact, I would say I'm very fair. If people have a better, more creative idea for projects, I welcome these ideas.

    The fact of the matter is: Several people do not have creative ideas, or they have forgotten. You have to coax and tickle it out of them.

    In essence you have to EDUCE (educate) the beauty within the mind and soul. If you're not educing, you are an INCOMPETENT teacher/professor.

    And I cannot help it if there are idiots out there who don't give a rat's ass. I GIVE MORE RATS' ASSES THAN LIVE IN NYC. And more I cannot do. I cannot compensate for incompetencies found in my field - I can just live up to my own high standards. And not all educators are idiots.

    VI. Conclusion

    Indeed education standards both in Germany and America need to be reworked and revamped; if you do not move forward, you fall behind. However, does this fact render the education system meaningless and vacuous? Only if we allow it to do so. Education does NOT HAVE TO BE a waste of your time - if you grasp opportunities, you will find the rare gems who love what they do, who have access to incredible contacts and resources, and who help you develop. Please do not write off an entire system due to its flaws; rather help us to rework the system so that it does bring the greatest benefit to the people who are willing and able to be receptive to its potential.
    Last edited by Little Linguist; 01-31-2010 at 02:58 PM.
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  6. #16
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    II. Higher education or low-wage job?

    One problem in the American school system is the nearly compulsory nature of university education. What students are paying for, in essence, is a chance at a decent living standard - nothing more.

    Check your newspapers. Is it easy to find jobs that do NOT require a university degree? Basically, our teachers presented our future possibilities as follows: get a university degree, or you are screwed because you are not going to hold a candle to the MILLIONS OF OTHER PEOPLE out there getting a B.A., even if you are bright. (There are obvious exceptions; however, I think you know what I mean).

    In fact, once we started university, the outlook seemed even more grim: since so many people are competing for so few jobs, you have to get a MASTER'S or a PH.D, or you won't hold a candle to the MILLIONS OF OTHER PEOPLE getting these academic titles. Great.

    What are they going to tell us when we get a Ph.D.? You're screwed if you don't get a double or triple doctorate? Waitresses must get a professorship to have a shot at a job? What the hell?.
    What are the possible strategies that we may employ to create jobs in America for people who lack a formal a degree?

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    In contrast, Germans have several alternatives to academia, which allows individuals with other interests and inclinations to congregate there. Although we are sadly also adopting the American trend towards university education for all, usually unsuitable students do indeed drop out rather than clogging the works because there are VIABLE alternatives. (FH, VHS, BK, IHK, etc.)?.
    Explain what they are in greater depth. Doing so may give us an idea of what can be done make people without a degree employable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    III. The issue of funding

    Meanwhile, in America people - also those who really should not be in academia - invest thousands and thousands of dollars in a worthless education that is so valuable (!) - what a paradox. One should also note that this education is not even compatible with other educational systems in other countries. That means you can invest $50,000 in your education, move to Europe, and they don't even know what the hell prestigious university you attended, and they sure as hell will not accept your degree. Super.

    Even worse, most people do not have the money to attend university, which forces students with limited funding to cater to the system or get poor grades, as a scholarship is the only means of entry. This fact leads most students (and people entering academia) to pander to conventional wisdom and not think outside the box.

    Most people still do not have all the funding they need to attend, and they take out huge amounts of loans to gain access to this worthlessly valuable education. This debt results in a nationwide populace that is not on stable financial footing - imagine, there are 22-year-olds who are already $60,000 in debt or MORE. And they do not even have car payments or a mortgage yet, assuming they do not have credit card debt up the ying-yang.

    The fact of the matter is: The government/state and financial institutions have you by the balls crying "MOMMY" before you even get a job. That makes for pretty compliant workers and citizens, now, doesn't it?

    All this aggravation, and you have not been even promised a job!!! But woe to he who decides to circumvent the system and go another route - he will surely not get a job at all!.)?.
    Although the statement that you must have a degree or you will never get a job and that if you have a degree, you'll probably get rich is false, there is something to it. People who lack a BA have significantly fewer resources than those who do have it. The problem is that getting a BA is extremely expensive, one way to fix the problem is to ensure the state provides more funds for universities, but how could this be done? Secondly, how could we provide sufficient employment opportunities for people who lack degrees, in the current American system this seems altogether unimaginable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    However, in Germany universities are indeed supported by the state, which means they do not have to pander to the needs of the 'plebeians', as you refer to them. Therefore, German universities have the freedom and funding to engage in other methods (whether or not they DO is another question, and German universities have their own issues I will address later.)

    Because German education is funded by the state, it is nearly free of charge. Although you would expect universities would swarm with plebeians who are idiotic, this trend generally only happens within the first year or two of higher education and becomes less prevalent. One issue I will concede is that the universities are filled with students who take forever FINISH university. Nonetheless, students typically realize that holding themselves to rigid standards of scholarship proves difficult and move to other areas (since there are other possibilities).!.)?.IV. Bureaucracy and standards

    However, German education has its own aggravating tendencies. I really do not know why educators lack passion in what they do - it seems that on all levels of the education system in Germany, people do not give a fat rat's ass one way or the other about their students. They abide by rules. Regulations. Nonsense.

    Thankfully at university, this habit mellows out, and people love what they do a great deal more, which is why I love teaching at university a great deal more than grades 5-13. You meet really wonderful colleagues who engage in exchange of ideas and the like. The students are really engaged and work with you. If you give them the freedom, they will explore and delve more deeply into matters.

    However, they are very strict with standards. No stamp, no go. Same with employers. No stamp? No degree? No job. You cannot do it. ARGH. Drives me bat-shit crazy. "You haven't studied English? Well then - you cannot teach English! Oh, you're a native speaker? Well, that's interesting, but you still cannot teach English! You have five years of experience teaching pupils, students, professionals from many different backgrounds? That's nice, you STILL CAN'T TEACH ENGLISH." This pedantic regimentation is extremely frustrating.

    In America, you at least have the option of getting jobs if you have a great deal of provable knowledge and experience - meaning as long as you do your job well, it does not matter if you have a certain stamp or not, contrary to what these pedantic academics want you to believe. Bosses want to know: CAN YOU DO THE JOB OR NOT? And if you are a kid who needs a wet nurse but has a Ph.D., you still will not hold a candle to the dude with real experience who knows what the hell he is doing.

    However, this freedom apparent in the American system IS DYING due to high competition for limited jobs. Nowadays, people swarm universities, flying on the magic carpet of debt, because they have no shot in hell of getting a job in the current labor market. So at the moment America is predicated on the necessity to obtain a university degree to EVEN HAVE A SHOT at decent jobs. This requirement makes no sense, particularly for jobs that do not really have implications that require higher education. In essence, this tendency renders the value of education to practically nil, although students pay a great deal of money. Therefore, this 'FREEDOM' in the American system necessitates a good, stable economy, or the whole thing falls apart.

    So when the American system works, I do like its relative freedom. As much as SolitaryWalker criticizes its bureaucracy (which is surely apparent) or its lack of originality and unconventionality.
    The bureaucracy of an Academic institution that I had in mind was of an altogether different kind than the one in Germany. The German bureaucracy, as you've described it, seems to consist of requirements that can be summarized as follows: if you don't have the following certificates or accolades, you don't get a job. The bureaucracy in American institutions is primarily about the student evaluation policy where students are graded not on the basis of the quality of their thinking, but on the basis of how precisely they follow the instructions.


    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    So when the American system works, I do like its relative freedom. As much as SolitaryWalker criticizes its bureaucracy (which is surely apparent) or its lack of originality and unconventionality (which is also a fact), it does not even come CLOSE to the bureaucracy and the regimentation we see in the GERMAN system. On the other hand, even though the standards are more regimented, there appears to be a greater freedom of thought in the German system.
    It is a curious historical observation that Germany produced many great scientists, philosophers and mathematicians. Possibly even more than any other European nation. Is there anything about the German culture as a whole that encourages deep thinking and creativity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    V. Educators' motivation

    One HUGE - and I mean HUGE - objection I have to SolitaryWalker's argument (although granted, he did indeed mention that he was not making a blanket statement) constitutes the idea that educators and academics do not care about their students.

    What.

    The.

    Hell?

    Well, I cannot speak for other idiotic morons that might be teachers, and granted there are a hell of a lot of people who couldn't give a rat's gas-expelling behind whether or not their students succeed.

    However, I have to say that I really do indeed genuinely care about my students and their success. In fact, I engage in a great deal more work than is required from me because I am so personally engaged. A good lesson makes me feel like I can reach to the skies; a poor lesson makes me grumpy the whole day, wallowing in my thoughts and analyzing what went wrong. Happy students make my heart sing; discontented students make my soul sink.

    Yes, indeed, we university educators (I am not a professor, simply a teacher there) do have to 'entertain' students as well insofar as we have to REACH them. When you have a bland subject like academic writing, you need to make it palatable to people, or they will zone out.

    However, I would not say I am a regimented teacher who does not accept things out of the norm; in fact, I would say I'm very fair. If people have a better, more creative idea for projects, I welcome these ideas.

    The fact of the matter is: Several people do not have creative ideas, or they have forgotten. You have to coax and tickle it out of them.

    In essence you have to EDUCE (educate) the beauty within the mind and soul. If you're not educing, you are an INCOMPETENT teacher/professor.

    And I cannot help it if there are idiots out there who don't give a rat's ass. I GIVE MORE RATS' ASSES THAN LIVE IN NYC. And more I cannot do. I cannot compensate for incompetencies found in my field - I can just live up to my own high standards. And not all educators are idiots.
    You're showing that you've misunderstood the point of my message. You know where? Right here, in the very title of the section.

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    V. Educators' motivation
    My point was not at all about the motives of educators but about the influence the system has upon college professors, it discourages them from being concerned with students as it forges a community that is altogether separate from the rest of society. Universities create what may be called a bohemian intellectual's paradise where they can avoid responsibilities that they should have as citizens of their community. Since they are encouraged to duck those responsibilities, their community minimizes their incentive to care about their students. The success of a professor's career does not depend on whether or not his students are learning, it depends on how well his professional publications are received by scholarly journals. Research is the primary part of their job, teaching is just something that they have to do in order to convince the rest of the society that they are performing a valuable service that they should be paid for. Had most of them had their own way, most Universities would not accept students at all.

    Regarding the motives of professors, I mentioned that most do not care about students because their community encourages them not to. Those who do otherwise are mavericks. The fact that you happen to care about your students does not refute the claim that most professors also do.


    VI. Conclusion

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Indeed education standards both in Germany and America need to be reworked and revamped; if you do not move forward, you fall behind. However, does this fact render the education system meaningless and vacuous? Only if we allow it to do so. Education does NOT HAVE TO BE a waste of your time - if you grasp opportunities, you will find the rare gems who love what they do, who have access to incredible contacts and resources, and who help you develop. Please do not write off an entire system due to its flaws; rather help us to rework the system so that it does bring the greatest benefit to the people who are willing and able to be receptive to its potential.
    What problem are we trying to solve by restructuring the educational system? The fact that American students are not genuinely learning? The fact that they fall far in debt and their job opportunities are not nearly as the universities and the general public led them to believe they would be?

    Which of these problems is the most important?
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  7. #17
    DoubleplusUngoodNonperson
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    Hype
    Posts
    2,078

    Default

    Very good post, i agree with most if not all of it.

    I also think a large part of the problem with Academia, that didn't seem to be mentioned, is the over-emphasis on GPA and simply "How many articles have you published". I believe this unfairly discriminates those with creative intellectual talents and puts more effort into regurgitating older, more sterile theories to the detriment of science and the humanities. I believe the "Publish or Perish" paradigm is a disease in an institution where high quality theories, values, ethics and reflection over them is supposed to be its most principle goal. The model scholar should resemble that of Edmund Gettier - parsimonious yet insightful and ground-breaking. Instead, academia prefers you to publish much and not make much noise in doing so.

    The modern (American) university has become a manufacturing facility of garbage, just so the wanna-be so called "scholars" (aka, those irrationally pursuing the American dream in your words) can say to others "Hey, look at ME! Give ME the high-paying professorial position because I've been published a lot!"


    I truly wish/long for the days when every student of the University was forced to learn Latin and Calculus - mandatory for all, because it instilled a "Stronger" mind more or less. These days, all one has to learn for a solid academic position is how to compute a mean and standard deviation (trivial in comparison to finding the solutions to a differential equation or reading Cicero). Compute your irrelevant, "statistically significant results" so the government and faculty can simply JUSTIFY keeping you there, because that's all they care about: ease of justification . There's no real effort intellectually, and no one's really trying to solve any problems of science or philosophy - they just want their phatty pants salaries and grants so they can coast in life. It's very sad indeed.

    However, part of me also believes this is pretty much the way its always been. Marx said the "history of academia is an economic history" and this rings too true today. However, not all persons in academia are there to secure a salary and tenure so they can sit fat and happy in life - i have met a couple people at my Uni that seem like genuinely, curious and scientifically minded folk, but they are TOO few and far between.

    If I ever become successful professionally and financially, I plan on putting forth a new model for a University that will try to steer clear of the road blocks to scientific progress that have been sewn in its wake.

  8. #18
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,529

    Thumbs down Originality

    To be awarded your Doctorate at a top ranking University, you need to demonstrate the ability for original thought.

    So the essence of a top University is originality.

  9. #19
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SolitaryWalker View Post
    It is a curious historical observation that Germany produced many great scientists, philosophers and mathematicians. Possibly even more than any other European nation.
    France?

  10. #20
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Socionics
    ENTj
    Posts
    5,908

    Default

    Italy?

    (btw, Germany is the most popolous nation in Western Europe, so it'd be perfectly normal if it had produced more eminent academics than the others; not to mention that Ashkenazi Jews used to reside mostly in western germany, and they are known for their drive towards academic achievment)

    Anyway, I wanted to comment on this:

    I also think a large part of the problem with Academia, that didn't seem to be mentioned, is the over-emphasis on GPA and simply "How many articles have you published". I believe this unfairly discriminates those with creative intellectual talents and puts more effort into regurgitating older, more sterile theories to the detriment of science and the humanities. I believe the "Publish or Perish" paradigm is a disease in an institution where high quality theories, values, ethics and reflection over them is supposed to be its most principle goal. The model scholar should resemble that of Edmund Gettier - parsimonious yet insightful and ground-breaking. Instead, academia prefers you to publish much and not make much noise in doing so.
    Actually, often rankings are based on measures such as the Impact Factor, which mostly takes into account how many citations your papers receive, rather than the sheer number of papers. This would ideally protect somebody that tends to discover very few extremely important things, since he'd always get more citations than somebody writing many papers on unimportant, unoriginal matters. Obviously these measures are not perfect, so they don't always produce the desidered results.

    I truly wish/long for the days when every student of the University was forced to learn Latin and Calculus
    LOL, Latin? Have you ever studied Latin? I have, for 5 years, It's a fucking dead language, it would be better to teach Chinese, Russian, Persian, Turkish (actually probably teach any agglutinative language would contribute significantly to open-mindedness, given their structure, completely different from the indo-european's branch structure). Every student in Italy hates latin, even the best and most motivated think it's a total waste of time.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

Similar Threads

  1. Essence of Apriori
    By SolitaryWalker in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 58
    Last Post: 01-22-2013, 09:04 PM
  2. Essence of Human nature
    By SolitaryWalker in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-16-2013, 11:10 PM
  3. Song Which Capture the Essence of Functions
    By Thalassa in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 11-06-2011, 04:18 PM
  4. [NF] Essence of People
    By nolla in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 11-19-2008, 07:13 PM
  5. [MBTItm] Essence of Feeling
    By SolitaryWalker in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 04-20-2008, 05:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO