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  1. #31
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Traditional schools kill creativity.
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by EnFpFer View Post
    Traditional schools kill creativity.
    *slow wanking motion*

    so do progressive schools.

    Both can put your mind in a box if you let them.

  3. #33
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    I think one of the most interesting seasons of The Apprentice (before they jumped the shark), was when they had a college educated team vs. a non-college educated team. Overall the non-collegiates were much more creative and independent in their ideas. On the other hand the college students were far better at working together. It seems to me that schools kill creativity and independent thinking, but teach people skills. Ironically the one thing it teaches best is not particularly on the curriculum.
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  4. #34
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    *slow wanking motion*

    so do progressive schools.

    Both can put your mind in a box if you let them.
    Agreed(I'm an unschooling supporter); although, I'm referring more to very young people(preschool, elementary aged,etc..), who have much less control over the box.

    By the way, are you wanking in my presence? I think you're in the wrong subforum.
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  5. #35
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    i've seen this as well. i love it and agree absolutely...screw the system!
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  6. #36
    Senior Member forzen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Of course not all Japanese are creative. But Japan does produce a lot of creative work. So, how can that be if schooling crushes creativity? That is my question, not that Japan is better than the US etc.

    You have to understand the difference between originality and creativeness. To be creative means to create something that is novel and unique and that is also useful and seen to be creative to others. It is not enough to just be original.

    You don't think Japan produces a lot of creative work?
    I been in Japan for three years, I wouldn't comment if they do this with everything, but they seem to have a mentality of "if it's not broken it can be improve." Japan's creativity is undermined by their fear of change. That's why America had to pretty much forced Japan to trade with them because the shogun closed the port to all foreigners in 1700s. However, what America introduced afterward was augmented with improvements and significantly improved the lifestyle in Japan. This was true with the train systems and computers. Also, modern japanese home are incorporating western toilets into their home lol. Creativity can't really surface when the workforce has a team mentality rather than a rambo mentality.

    However, they are very creative with Tentacles and its uses, I'll give them that.
    This post grammatical errors had been intentionally left uncorrected.

  7. #37
    Senior Member forzen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EnFpFer View Post
    Traditional schools kill creativity.
    Well to an extent, you do need to know what's already known. Their only teaching you establish facts.
    This post grammatical errors had been intentionally left uncorrected.

  8. #38
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    I don't know about this.

    I've found that I've actually felt more like writing during school, written more during school, had better ideas during school, and generally written better quality work during school than I ever have during vacations -- and I'm not talking about assignments, either.
    Same. It seems that I get in a mentally activated mood if I am somehow "forced" to reflect. Although, of course, this is only valid if I'm studying an at least mildly complex subject, where I need to put some effort to understand the concepts deeply.
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  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    I think one of the most interesting seasons of The Apprentice (before they jumped the shark), was when they had a college educated team vs. a non-college educated team. Overall the non-collegiates were much more creative and independent in their ideas. On the other hand the college students were far better at working together. It seems to me that schools kill creativity and independent thinking, but teach people skills. Ironically the one thing it teaches best is not particularly on the curriculum.
    This is interesting. I've always seen creativity as a balance between learning how to do something and being free to approach it however you like. The more you learn the how to do it, the more skilled you get at it, but the more you conform to the method and do it less uniquely your way. This is why I like the idea of teaching fundamentals rather than methods or approaches. Higher level stuff tells the student how to do something, when understanding the medium they have to work within is far more powerful.
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  10. #40
    Badoom~ Skyward's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noigmn View Post
    This is interesting. I've always seen creativity as a balance between learning how to do something and being free to approach it however you like. The more you learn the how to do it, the more skilled you get at it, but the more you conform to the method and do it less uniquely your way. This is why I like the idea of teaching fundamentals rather than methods or approaches. Higher level stuff tells the student how to do something, when understanding the medium they have to work within is far more powerful.
    Yes. It allows the student to develop their own tools and methods of approach, increasing the variety of the things created. They also better understand how to work with the medium rather than just certain ways to work with it. Creative people naturally experiment with the medium to learn how to work with it, but if they aren't rewarded for that in schools, well, then schools are not encouraging creativity. The problem is that schools also have to each the not-so-creative people. If a system to put students into classes that follow their talents the students will actually grow in knowledge and understanding. Too bad it doesn't work well in a large school setting because then the teachers have to deal with 30+ students in a class and with classes that change every hour.

    I still think the Master/Apprentice approach to learning something, especially something creative like smithing or painting, is the best way to learn (at least for me). The master can have more than one apprentice, but shouldn't have too many.
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