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  1. #41
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    @Little Linguist: I certainly understand what you mean LL but there are certain jobs that are the dreams of these students. And the only way they'd be able to achieve it is to go through the college for it. What most people are doing are looking at the negatives of college which of course brings them to the conclusion that college isn't for learning. They talk about the bad professors... what about the good ones? Why don't they get any credit for actually properly teaching the students what they need to know about their future profession. (I know you're not saying this. I just wanted to put it in)

    Very true. Many flaws about college doesn't allow the student to reach their full potential. But I wouldn't think that would matter as much once they get the degree. This is because if they are indeed a bright students people will look at them for their work experience rather than what college they were in after a number of years of work experience. They would learn everything to their full potential during their work. And they would shine in their work if they are in fact good in what they do.

  2. #42
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    ^ do you not count certain colleges such as medical school, science, etc.? You can't really say medical school is just a business.
    No you're right, I consider medical school a vocational school. It's a school with a specified purpose to train a very particular category, and thus learning in that category is accomplished.
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  3. #43
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    No you're right, I consider medical school a vocational school. It's a school with a specified purpose to train a very particular category, and thus learning in that category is accomplished.
    I see. That's all well then.

  4. #44
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    ^ Yes. Keeping in mind that this is a personal answer from my experience thus far to the question. I'm glad I'm getting my "degree" and I'm glad I'm going to have a stable job about it all, but I don't think college is a place for learning. I think it's a business based on learning, and my experiences with it have never let me forget that.

    I'm not saying I don't learn while in college. I learn from all the expereinces I get in life. but I don't think college is a foundation for learning the way it should be. I think it's moved, sadly, away from that.
    This is what I thought until I left behind my 21 credit hours of chemistry and 18 credit hours of biology to go earn a "useless" liberal arts degree.

    The more practical and career-oriented your degree the less you understand in the longer term, because ultimately your goal is memorizing the shit that the profs told you is important rather than exploring the ideas that intrigue you.
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  5. #45
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    ^ Entirely agreed. I don't see what Intro to world religion has to do with a pre-med degree, but I'm getting my bachelors in something easy while taking all the pre-med requirements to maintain some of my sanity.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
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  6. #46
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    College is about learning but a lot of it is making connections and prestige, too. You can learn anywhere but not everywhere can you get connections and prestige.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  7. #47
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    ^ Entirely agreed. I don't see what Intro to world religion has to do with a pre-med degree, but I'm getting my bachelors in something easy while taking all the pre-med requirements to maintain some of my sanity.
    In undergrad, science as a discipline is pretty easy if you're just learning what's already been discovered (I found chemistry made a lot more sense the higher I went) what's hard in science is the volume of information they expect you to hold onto to weed out the premeds, when in reality you'd be focusing on one molecule for several months or you'd have your text in front of you. The theories of science are not that challenging when you're still in undergrad. I'd argue that liberal arts theories that undergrads take on are more challenging in the upper years, it just links together better in a schema in the liberal arts, whereas in the sciences you're becoming a textbook memorizing every little ketone and carbon ring positioning on top of learning the theories.

    Disciplines themselves =/= easy or hard, it's how they're evaluated that makes them easier or harder.
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
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  8. #48
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    I just wanted to say that I just took a test in college (graduate school) that had many questions that were NOT on the required reading. I studied really hard and knew most everything all the way through. I talked it over with some fellow students and they agreed and shared the same experience. The professor said, "Guys, I want to let you know I'm not trying to fool anyone with any of these questions. There are no tricks in this test." Whenever they say that, THERE ALWAYS ARE TRICKS! It's an invariable rule.

    So right now, I feel, college is about learning, to a certain degree (no pun intended). Grades usually AREN'T; so much of it is working the system somehow.

    The good side of this: from studying hard, I learned a ton of fantastic new information that could conceivably help me to know someday. I'm just gonna focus on that for now.

    Sorry for the rant, but it felt good to write.
    A hero is someone who does the right thing without expectation of reward, just because it's the right thing to do.

  9. #49
    Senior Member blanclait's Avatar
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    ^
    bit unrelated but reminds me of my textiles lecture. We have 1 lecture every 2 weeks, so when midterm was in, half the students didn't get the lecture notes until after the exam.


    Anyways,

    Thank you for everyone who posted, it helped me understand the "true nature" of what college/university is.
    I guess my rant was out of extreme disappointment because this wasn't the college Ive been working toward all these years.

    Anyways, enough of that crap,
    I have a question for anyone who attended those prestige school, or w/e they are called these days.

    Is the education better in prestigious universities? I been thinking about getting MFA at Yale for Fine arts in the future.
    But this is under the assumptions that these universities have:
    *good professors, that are open minded
    *good curriculum that brings out people's potential and not about making them an average working class robot
    * quite the number of brilliant students (not studious)

    Right now I'm thinking they are not that much better, but what is only being upgraded is the connections, which i think is quite important as well.
    Keep in mind, this is graduate school. Or is there really no difference b/w the two... ?

  10. #50
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usehername View Post
    In undergrad, science as a discipline is pretty easy if you're just learning what's already been discovered (I found chemistry made a lot more sense the higher I went) what's hard in science is the volume of information they expect you to hold onto to weed out the premeds, when in reality you'd be focusing on one molecule for several months or you'd have your text in front of you. The theories of science are not that challenging when you're still in undergrad. I'd argue that liberal arts theories that undergrads take on are more challenging in the upper years, it just links together better in a schema in the liberal arts, whereas in the sciences you're becoming a textbook memorizing every little ketone and carbon ring positioning on top of learning the theories.

    Disciplines themselves =/= easy or hard, it's how they're evaluated that makes them easier or harder.
    As a math and physics double major, with lots of friends who studied engineering, I can not concur with the above. Chemistry has a reputation for being FAR "easier" and less mathematical [and also intense and cerebral] than does physics. People always talk about how hard quantum mechanics is, not how easy it is. I've never heard anyone say "Gosh, physics is SOO easy. I need something that is actually challenging!"

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