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  1. #41
    Senior Member Timmy's Avatar
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    Babylon

    You misquoted another member, Greyscale, when you quoted the following in your response after mine. I wrote that, not Greyscale...I wouldn't want someone else's words put in my mouth, so I assume most others wouldn't, either. I am not offended, so no need to apologize...at least not to me.



    I might get a larger house, but it wouldn't be in the trendy rich-people neighborhoods. I'd buy a bunch of property and build a large, functional house with functional shit in it. Nothing would be "don't sit on that..." quality.

    Finally, to the OP: I can tell you already that your "scorekeeping" system and need for external validation will never be satisfied. You will never earn enough, receive enough praise or be high enough in the "caste" system to satisfy you. Because there will always be someone else earning more than you, better than you or higher than you.

    So you'll try and achieve that, too.

    In the vernacular of us lower-caste people, it's known as "keeping up with the Joneses", except that in your perceived world of satisfaction, it's the Hearsts that you have to keep up with.

    Good luck with that.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonsequitur View Post
    I think doing a job to "win" is one of the most ridiculous ideas ever. You will never win. There will never be an end point.
    I agree... you need to question what feelings you are being motivated by here. Greed is not a love for money but a fear of not having enough money, which is why those with a 6-figure income say millionaires are rich, millionaires say billionaires are rich, etc. Until you face down the fear of inadequacy or insufficiency then relative "success" in the eyes of others will only be covering it up; it will rear its ugly head again once you see someone who has more than you.

    Lifespan is the only finite attributed asset we have, so unless you fill it with the things you love then you are sacrificing your most valuable asset for nothing. Happiness comes easier when you focus on the pursuit of things you love rather than avoidance of things you're afraid of, especially if/when those fears turn out to be more irrational than we thought.

  3. #43
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    My Dad is a Periodontist (INTJ [i think]), and my Mom (ENFJ [i think])used to run fashion shows for May Cohens in NY and other places(back when that was still a company), but has just been a mom since I was born.

    My parents always wanted me to do what I wanted to do, as long as it was respectable i.e. med, law, business. Luckily, I have a lot of my Grandfather (who was a litigator) in me, so I naturally headed towards law. That being said, my father pushed hard for me to pickup a second major in economics or finance.

    I tried econ. for a semester and realized that I still hated doing math. I dropped my econ double major, and luckily my dad let it go at that.

    BC - If I could only tell you one piece of advice its this. There is no amount of any material good on this planet that is worth doing something you don't love.

    If you love what you do, you won't work a day in your life. You'll also be less likely to quit/get burnt out, and also work harder.

    A salary isn't the only way to generate $$$.

    It's looking like I'm going to go into criminal law which (while compensated well compared to regular jobs) is known for not paying nearly as well as private law.

    Despite this, I plan on trying to set up some passive revenue streams for myself, such as land development, franchising restaurants, or whatever opportunities present themselves to me.

    Obviously, my ideas require seed capital which may not be available to you in your case. However, I used myself as an example of how to think outside the box.

    Your hopes and dreams should be tied up in doing what you love, being a good person, and finding someone to love you. If you can get those things squared away, you'll probably be a far happier person whom, consequently, has an easier time working harder, and making more money.

  4. #44
    Senior Member avolkiteshvara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post


    BC - If I could only tell you one piece of advice its this. There is no amount of any material good on this planet that is worth doing something you don't love.

    If you love what you do, you won't work a day in your life. You'll also be less likely to quit/get burnt out, and also work harder.

    A salary isn't the only way to generate $$$.
    Not that I totally disagree, but where you are at on Maslow's Pyramid before you enter school has a lot to do with where you end up and what route you take.

  5. #45
    Babylon Candle Venom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by avolkiteshvara View Post
    Not that I totally disagree, but where you are at on Maslow's Pyramid before you enter school has a lot to do with where you end up and what route you take.
    im familiar with the pyramid, and I have an idea of where you're going with this...but im also really curious as to your thoughts...

    could you maybe expand your post?

  6. #46
    Senior Member avolkiteshvara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babylon Candle View Post
    im familiar with the pyramid, and I have an idea of where you're going with this...but im also really curious as to your thoughts...

    could you maybe expand your post?
    Take a person who has been poor most of their life. Offer them two paths at college:

    One path puts you in financial debt and no guarantee of a job after graduating, but he/she likes the subject.

    The other puts you on a path of studying a different subject the you don't particularly enjoy, buy you'll definitely get a good job after school and better your standard of living.

    I think most poor young kids don't have the vision to look past the pragmatic route. I'd also be willing to bet a higher % high income kids major in the humanities and social sciences than poorer kids.

    HERE is a more extreme example of how poverty can affect neural development.

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