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  1. #11
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Third Rider View Post
    Thats the thing, i am trying to find a well balanced job/career, I want to enjoy it or the very least not hate it, but I want it to pay well which is my main concern and be on a decent demand for my services. I know too many people that have gone on to college, get a degree and do nothing related to what they studied and pay loads of maney for.
    That goes to show they are not necessarily making use of their degree, no?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    I chose this major for pragmatic reasons and now I'm having a hard time finishing it. Not because it's that hard, but because, on top of being lazy, I hate most subjects. If it were today, I'd probably go to art school or something. Dunno.
    Pretty much sums up my college experience. Except that I don't think I hate most subjects. I feel like I can be good in a variety of areas and am overwhelmed with possibilities.

  3. #13

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    I don't know enough to really give you any suggestions, but if you feel like you're stuck, looking for something else sooner rather than later is vitally important.

    I can give you my take on the fields I do know about.

    Computer engineering (really any engineering) is generally pretty lucrative (you wont be rich, but you won't be poor). There are many levels in that field. You're actually working at one level, IT help-desk, that is pretty common.

    Types of Software varies a lot. Doing web related work is the biggest market, but also the least paying (though it is really good money too), because the supply of people capable is very large. The nice thing here is that people still seem to have an entrepreneurial spirit, and take risks.

    Hardware jobs have a smaller market, but there are also far fewer qualified, so the pay is higher.

    Being a Systems Integrator is something that someone can pick-up without much prior knowledge and can get you into 6 figures after just a four or five years experience. System Integrators are required to be local, so are less affected by outsourcing.

    Computer Architecture is tougher to get because there are only a few big companies (and a bunch of small ones in Silicon Valley) who hire, but this is still a six-figure job, easy.

    Integrated Circuit design is a related field, also with a limited number of companies (essentially the same ones as Computer Architecture plus a few analog companies), and the compensation for this is just slightly below computer architects.

    I would say however, that most of the computer engineering jobs have become increasingly tedious because companies no longer risk doing new designs, or even changing the old ones much. I heard this from most of my friends who were Computer Science/Engineering majors and have experienced it myself.

    So if you're going into this field it may be better to work in a sub-field with both large demand and supply (like web-related services) since they tend to also give you the most scope for design and innovation.

    Also, a lot of my friends have gone to law school after getting their technical degrees (the MBAs have gone out of fashion). Also, lawyers have surpassed doctors in being the most well-compensated group.

    But again, many of my lawyer friends have stated they are miserable in that job. The main exceptions are the ones who work for non-profits, or some cause they believe in.

    So, I guess my main piece of advice is to ignore the monetary aspect of the career decision, and find something you like. Most salaries that are on a track of what people call "careers" pay well enough to survive.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
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    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  4. #14
    Babylon Candle Venom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    I don't know enough to really give you any suggestions, but if you feel like you're stuck, looking for something else sooner rather than later is vitally important.

    I can give you my take on the fields I do know about.

    Computer engineering (really any engineering) is generally pretty lucrative (you wont be rich, but you won't be poor). There are many levels in that field. You're actually working at one level, IT help-desk, that is pretty common.

    Types of Software varies a lot. Doing web related work is the biggest market, but also the least paying (though it is really good money too), because the supply of people capable is very large. The nice thing here is that people still seem to have an entrepreneurial spirit, and take risks.

    Hardware jobs have a smaller market, but there are also far fewer qualified, so the pay is higher.

    Being a Systems Integrator is something that someone can pick-up without much prior knowledge and can get you into 6 figures after just a four or five years experience. System Integrators are required to be local, so are less affected by outsourcing.

    Computer Architecture is tougher to get because there are only a few big companies (and a bunch of small ones in Silicon Valley) who hire, but this is still a six-figure job, easy.

    Integrated Circuit design is a related field, also with a limited number of companies (essentially the same ones as Computer Architecture plus a few analog companies), and the compensation for this is just slightly below computer architects.

    I would say however, that most of the computer engineering jobs have become increasingly tedious because companies no longer risk doing new designs, or even changing the old ones much. I heard this from most of my friends who were Computer Science/Engineering majors and have experienced it myself.

    So if you're going into this field it may be better to work in a sub-field with both large demand and supply (like web-related services) since they tend to also give you the most scope for design and innovation.

    Also, a lot of my friends have gone to law school after getting their technical degrees (the MBAs have gone out of fashion). Also, lawyers have surpassed doctors in being the most well-compensated group.

    But again, many of my lawyer friends have stated they are miserable in that job. The main exceptions are the ones who work for non-profits, or some cause they believe in.

    So, I guess my main piece of advice is to ignore the monetary aspect of the career decision, and find something you like. Most salaries that are on a track of what people call "careers" pay well enough to survive.
    i would be interested in hearing more about Doctors, lawyers and how an MBA is out of style now....

    1. i would bet that if you took out the low paid doctors (family prac and GP) that they would be a lot more comparable to lawyers.

    2. yes, getting any ol' MBA is not worth it. Surely an MBA from a top 20 school is still worth it (and a lot less tedious than law school).

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Babylon Candle View Post
    i would be interested in hearing more about Doctors, lawyers and how an MBA is out of style now....

    1. i would bet that if you took out the low paid doctors (family prac and GP) that they would be a lot more comparable to lawyers.

    2. yes, getting any ol' MBA is not worth it. Surely an MBA from a top 20 school is still worth it (and a lot less tedious than law school).
    I don't know about #1. It would be hard to do a fair comparison. Taking out family practice and general practitioners removes most doctors that the public sees on a regular basis.

    I'm also pretty sure the costs of business as doctors, GP or specialist, own practice or hospital, are much higher than for lawyers, individual or in a firm.

    I think getting degrees from a top tier school in any field really improves ones chances of making that degree valuable. I don't know if the top 20 is right or not. I think in terms of "tiers." For engineering the top tier goes to about 25 (give or take), not sure what it is for business.

    It seems like anyone can get an MBA easily, just go to your local University of Phoenix or whatever.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  6. #16
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    gygolo?

  7. #17
    Babylon Candle Venom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    I don't know about #1. It would be hard to do a fair comparison. Taking out family practice and general practitioners removes most doctors that the public sees on a regular basis.
    im working with the assumption that no rational person would get into the MD field without wanting to be a specialist. being a GP is simply not worth it in this day and age. so if you start with the assumption that you would only be a specialist (what most pre meds assume now), then lawyer vs doc pay might be more equal.

    I think getting degrees from a top tier school in any field really improves ones chances of making that degree valuable. I don't know if the top 20 is right or not. I think in terms of "tiers." For engineering the top tier goes to about 25 (give or take), not sure what it is for business.

    It seems like anyone can get an MBA easily, just go to your local University of Phoenix or whatever.
    thats exactly the point im making. if you had to get an MBA from a low tier or a law degree from a low tier the law degree will be more valuable, yes. However, that doesnt necissarily make all MBAs "out of style" or worth less than all law degrees. top tier MBAs still get you paid .


    i know the tone is kind of argumentative, but i really just wanted to point out a few places to disagree

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