User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 31

  1. #11
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx/so
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    5,554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Babylon Candle View Post
    ive been playing for 6 years. took lessons for the first 3.

    all i wanted to learn in lessons was technique. i wanted to master: scales, alternate picking, string skipping, legato vs staccato runs, arpeggios, sweeping etc. i always wanted harder exercises, better technique or use of theory etc.

    i really had no desire to learn a specific song, even though i loved listening to music (especially metal). i think i just intuitevly knew that i needed to have the chops before i got bogged down trying to learn songs.

    so as a result, i could REALLY wank around quite well, wether it was pentatonic bluesly stuff, or more melodic stuff... but i always got shit because i wasnt that asshole who knew how to play every "sublime" song (god i HATE those people!)

    within the last year i finally started learning full songs...almost out of nowhere i just started. i think in the first week i started i learned like 8 metallica songs haha.

    Classic NT musician syndrome. I played bass in a band in high school where we did a lot of goofy technical shit and used 8 million pedals, but our songs weren't really that good. I was obsessed with uber technique for a long time; Victor Wooten was my hero. One day I kind of realized that nobody really cares how good your chops are if you don't have any unique expression or artistry to your playing.

    There's a very popular Sublime tribute band around Atlanta here, actually. I play in an Incubus tribute band and we've been working to get some opening gigs with them, because they have a big draw. They have a big draw because they play songs that people care about. Funny that I don't see any Dream Theater tribute bands making money on the club circuit, no?

    I'm sure Yngwie Malmsteen could have shredded George Harrison into the ground, but which one has lasting cultural impact?

    More to the point, which one do people care about?
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  2. #12
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    6,028

    Default

    Thank you, simulatedworld! That was extremely helpful and encouraging!

    And yeah, I stuck with it because I loved it, even through the monstrous suckage! I'm learning a lot quicker now...just never as quickly as I want!
    Last edited by Tallulah; 02-06-2009 at 07:55 PM.
    Something Witty

  3. #13
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    infp
    Posts
    2,726

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post

    Another thing to remember is that everyone, absolutely everyone, sucks at first. Yes, even at singing! American Idol culture would have you believe that singing is a God-given talent where you're either phenomenal from birth, or doomed to be awful for all eternity. No no no, singing is just another instrument that requires hundreds of hours of focused cultivation to sound good in a live performance setting--being talented just means you don't have to practice *quite as much* as other people; it's absolutely not a necessity for anyone who genuinely enjoys music and is willing to consistently work hard on it. (Obviously the very best players are both talented and very hard workers, but remember that hard work>>>talent any day...before you swim, you've gotta be ok to sink!)
    I've always wanted to learn to sing but I figured it was just like you said, you were either born with an amazing voice, or you weren't, end of dream lol. I see the classes for training your voice etc and I assumed they were just a rip off. It's not that I sound bad, I've been told I sound good, and it's not even so that I can be a singer for people, but I write songs, and I am learning to play the piano and I would like to sell my songs, but want to sing them decently for demos.

    Heh, guess I will enrol in that class in april then.
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

    Berb's Johari Berb's Nohari

  4. #14
    Senior Member Gauche's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    333

    Default

    I've been learning to play the guitar for about 2-3 years, completely self-taught, never attended anything regular, never taught by anyone.
    I'd say my style would fit best NT and NF descriptions. I've been always mad about mastering the scales, the chord progressions and theoretical connections and then only to improvise from the gut like hell. I've been also learning new families of chords systematically, but rote practice was kind of exhausting for me, and I've never stood long with that. I've learned about 2-3 whole songs, but many short themes, and some badass solos as well. I was also mad about techniques, I remeber the times when I couldn't even pick properly, but I had been bending like hell already. I've also composed a few licks, solos, and the whole song skelets.

    Though I was an amateur and not playing for very long, all my fellow-guitarists from classroom was amazed by my theoretical basis and techniques, and then always came to me to tune a guitar or to ask about some theoretical shit. They practiced let's say for the same time as me. Never been into theory though and I was mentoring them from time to time. I must note I really suck at the clearness of the play; technical mistakes here and there

    Currently, I play only occasionally for pleasure, and not learning anything new. It's the thing of motivation and priorities. But I'm convinced I'd once return back to it and beat the crap out of that guitar

  5. #15
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx/so
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    5,554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BerberElla View Post
    I've always wanted to learn to sing but I figured it was just like you said, you were either born with an amazing voice, or you weren't, end of dream lol. I see the classes for training your voice etc and I assumed they were just a rip off. It's not that I sound bad, I've been told I sound good, and it's not even so that I can be a singer for people, but I write songs, and I am learning to play the piano and I would like to sell my songs, but want to sing them decently for demos.

    Heh, guess I will enrol in that class in april then.
    Do it. The way I learned was sort of by accident; I had a delivery job so I was in the car like upwards of 20 hours a week and I just used the time to sing with CDs until I figured out what I was doing. After a while I started taking weekly lessons from a local opera singer, and within several months I was good enough to start singing at local clubs with bands and such.

    It's just a really gradual process and it takes an awful lot of patience--remember, singing is an instrument too. You don't pick up a guitar and expect to be good the first time you touch it, so why would you expect to be good the first time you make a serious attempt at learning to sing well?

    Don't give up...remember:

    1) Drink a metric shit ton of water. This is like oil for an engine; if you try to sing full force without drinking copious amounts of water you will kill your throat. (That said, there is a limit...I've gotten water poisoning a couple of times because my voice needed rest and I mistook that feeling for dehydration. It's not pleasant; if you start to feel sick, just stop.)

    2) Spend a lot of time stretching and opening up your breathing beforehand. Air and Water are the two most important things. It helps to do some physical exercise before singing in order to get your blood flowing/lung span up.

    3) This one comes in a little later, but...let go of your attachment to lyrics/specific pronunciations. Learn to sing the song with just nonsense words, no lyrics, whatever way you can shape your mouth/throat to make those notes come out RELAXED. Ever wonder why every famous singer has certain words or phrases that s/he pronounces like a total weirdo? That's because the higher you go, the less picky you can be about pronunciation/mouth shape and still get the pitch you want without physically hurting your throat. (In other words, no, Fall Out Boy isn't actually singing, "This ain't a city, it's a golf cart ass face"; it just sounds that way because the notes are really high and so the singer is forced to place pitch and tone as higher priorities than precise vowel/consonant shapes.)
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  6. #16
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    6,028

    Default

    Excellent singing tips!

    What's the best way to really learn the fretboard?
    Something Witty

  7. #17
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx/so
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    5,554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallulah View Post
    Excellent singing tips!

    What's the best way to really learn the fretboard?
    Pick a note at random and practice playing every single instance of that note on the whole fretboard in succession. (e.g., "Now I will play every F# on the whole neck.") Try to visualize everything above 12th fret as the same thing as everything below it...i.e, 15th fret = 3rd, 17th = 5th, and so on.

    Also learn little shortcuts for transferring notes up/down octaves and to different strings. The best one is 2 frets+2 strings = an octave. If you're trying to think of what note 8th fret G is, go down 2 frets+2 strings to 6th fret A, which hopefully you can remember as Eb.

    Also 7 frets+1 string accomplishes the same thing, or 12 frets up or down on the same string. There are 5 frets difference between strings in every instance except between the G and B (which I address below.) So if you've got 3rd fret on the D string, you can get the same note at 8th fret on the A, or 13th on the low E (or even 18th on the extra low B string, if you have a 7-string guitar.)

    The only exception is when you cross the barrier between the G and B strings--this is the only place on the guitar where the interval between the open strings is not a fourth (it's a major third instead.) So, imagine this barrier between G and B, and any time you use any of these patterns across this barrier, all notes on the B and high E strings must be compensated up one fret. (So, for instance, going UP an octave from 8th fret G would actually put you on 11th fret high E, not 10th, since you've crossed the G/B barrier.)

    Figure out all of your scales in 3 octaves. This forces you to actually spread them out across the neck instead of sticking to limited areas.

    (On a side note, I am genuinely perplexed by this reputation message from proteanmix telling me that this post didn't say anything new. Really? I got a lot more reputation from several different people telling me they found it interesting and insightful. Wtf is s/he talking about?)
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  8. #18
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    6,028

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    Pick a note at random and practice playing every single instance of that note on the whole fretboard in succession. (e.g., "Now I will play every F# on the whole neck.") Try to visualize everything above 12th fret as the same thing as everything below it...i.e, 15th fret = 3rd, 17th = 5th, and so on.

    Also learn little shortcuts for transferring notes up/down octaves and to different strings. The best one is 2 frets+2 strings = an octave. If you're trying to think of what note 8th fret G is, go down 2 frets+2 strings to 6th fret A, which hopefully you can remember as Eb.

    Also 7 frets+1 string accomplishes the same thing, or 12 frets up or down on the same string. There are 5 frets difference between strings in every instance except between the G and B (which I address below.) So if you've got 3rd fret on the D string, you can get the same note at 8th fret on the A, or 13th on the low E (or even 18th on the extra low B string, if you have a 7-string guitar.)

    The only exception is when you cross the barrier between the G and B strings--this is the only place on the guitar where the interval between the open strings is not a fourth (it's a major third instead.) So, imagine this barrier between G and B, and any time you use any of these patterns across this barrier, all notes on the B and high E strings must be compensated up one fret. (So, for instance, going UP an octave from 8th fret G would actually put you on 11th fret high E, not 10th, since you've crossed the G/B barrier.)

    Figure out all of your scales in 3 octaves. This forces you to actually spread them out across the neck instead of sticking to limited areas.

    (On a side note, I am genuinely perplexed by this reputation message from proteanmix telling me that this post didn't say anything new. Really? I got a lot more reputation from several different people telling me they found it interesting and insightful. Wtf is s/he talking about?)
    Oh, thank you! I'm going to print this out and work with it. I feel like I won't really be a real player until I really know the fretboard, you know? I feel like I'm just learning chords and songs.

    I don't know what the neg/neutral rep was about--I think it's HIGHLY helpful for musicians! Thank you for sharing your knowledge!
    Something Witty

  9. #19
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx/so
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    5,554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallulah View Post
    Oh, thank you! I'm going to print this out and work with it. I feel like I won't really be a real player until I really know the fretboard, you know? I feel like I'm just learning chords and songs.

    I don't know what the neg/neutral rep was about--I think it's HIGHLY helpful for musicians! Thank you for sharing your knowledge!
    I mean yeah at this point it's just a matter of practicing scales (both regular and intervallic) to become comfortable with different keys, and conceptualizing them as such (functional keys with scale degrees, not just fret numbers.)

    I'm sure you know regular scales, but an intervallic scale takes each note of the scale and then follows it with a note a certain interval up (say 3rds or 5ths or 6ths), but sharping or flatting the notes to stay in key. For instance, regular C scale:

    C D E F G A B C

    Intervallic C scale in 3rds:

    C E D F E G F A G B A C B D C

    See, it's still the scale, but interspersed with the note either a minor third(3 half steps) or a major third (4 half steps) above each scale degree. So the 1st, then 3rd...2nd, then 4th...3rd, then 5th...and so on through the whole scale. Practicing these for each interval will really help to liven up your improvisation because it teaches you to do more than just go to the very next adjacent note in the scale.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  10. #20
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    6,028

    Default

    ^^

    Oh, that's a good idea, b/c I had noticed that when I was learning scales before, I kind of got stuck in the same patterns when I tried to learn to solo. So I just kinda gave up trying to solo for a while.
    Something Witty

Similar Threads

  1. MBTI Type and I.Q.
    By RansomedbyFire in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 1059
    Last Post: 08-20-2017, 08:04 AM
  2. Replies: 26
    Last Post: 12-02-2008, 01:28 PM
  3. Your MBTI type and your Socionics type
    By 527468 in forum Socionics
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 11-28-2008, 04:03 PM
  4. MBTI type and Hypnotizability
    By Usehername in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-20-2008, 02:05 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO