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  1. #21
    Dhampyr Economica's Avatar
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    How about providing them with examples of renowned English Lit majors who've accomplished something based on the skills they gleaned from their major?

  2. #22
    Senior Member edcoaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Economica View Post
    How about providing them with examples of renowned English Lit majors who've accomplished something based on the skills they gleaned from their major?
    Anyone have a list handy?
    edcoaching

  3. #23
    Senior Member Eileen's Avatar
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    There's always Garrison Keillor... I really should get a P.O.E.M. shirt...

    And here's a list, but I don't think it matters: Famous English Majors

    Edit: That list is stupid because it lists "Bill Shakespeare." Stupid! Another list offered up Hank Paulson, which might explain the state of our economy. (JK, it's more complicated than that)


    Seriously, I'm with everyone else who says that you shouldn't have to defend your major. I do think that an English major is less rigorous than lots of majors, but so is a degree in business or communications (which are supposed to be "useful"). And it's kind of cool that you can get an English major and take a variety of directions--teaching, marketing, editing, writing, etc. I was an English major for two reasons: I wanted to teach high school, and that was the subject I felt I'd excel at the job with; and I liked reading and writing in depth. I took on a religious studies minor because I loved reading and writing in depth about religion. Is it going to get me a job? It is unlikely. Do I feel smarter and more enriched for it? Definitely.
    INFJ

    "I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

  4. #24
    / nonsequitur's Avatar
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    Hahah. My friend (who was an English/Literature major) was a lot more sensible and critical than some of the PhDs in Biochem whom I know. Also, she wrote a lot better. Seriously. You shouldn't have to explain your major to anyone. I saw her major as an opportunity to pick her mind and connect with her about mutual loves/interests... not as a means to put her down so that I could feel better about my more "useful" (debatable) degree.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    UserHerName,I reread your post this moring and appreciate the ironic truth in it.

    Yes, having the availability of the world's literaure at one's recall enriches experience and meaning in life and gives a person resources to draw upon for life view and ideas.

    It's interesting to me that all those things I studied can be returned to and change in meaning and depth to me with time.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  6. #26
    Senior Member hermeticdancer's Avatar
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    INFJ's and INFP's are the best writers, innately.
    Im envious of that ability. Even though its hard to make money at it...

    INTJ's and INTP's are good at writing about logic, and theoretical abstract stuff.

    Thats what I think.

  7. #27
    Senior Member hermeticdancer's Avatar
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    My guidance counselor at OSU, is an English major, w/ her masters in creative writing. She writes on the side, and fufills her passion that way. She seems kind of independent, didn't want to teach after trying that, or write for other people. She wanted to write her own stuff. She had a lot of cat pictures and flower art work on the walls.

  8. #28
    Arcesso pulli gingerios! Eldanen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hermeticdancer View Post
    INFJ's and INFP's are the best writers, innately.
    Im envious of that ability. Even though its hard to make money at it...

    INTJ's and INTP's are good at writing about logic, and theoretical abstract stuff.

    Thats what I think.
    Depends on what you say is good writing . But I find that INFJs (socionics INFps) often go into the writing field and are able to do quite well. One thing I like about their writing is that, at least with Terry Brooks, it isn't too long-winded, but he seems to be able to pack down what he wants to say into fewer words than an ST like J. R. R. Tolkien would. Reading TB is kind of like chewing on a starburst candy or something. It just explodes in your mouth in a sensation of fruity goodness. ENTPs can be good at writing on an artistic level too, although they seem to enjoy creating interleaving systems even in artistic situations, kind of like how David Eddings does in his series. The Belgariad, the Malloreon, etc.

    When an Si & Ne person writes, it has a script-like sort of tone, detailed and intricate, and subtle, so you have to read into it. When you have an Ni person writing it's kind of like the words jump out at you in a burst of color.

  9. #29
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoryOfMyLife View Post
    Yes and no?

    Writing is a skill. Not everyone can be fantastic at it. Some people lack the ability to draw in a reader, no matter how much they try. Voice in writing is everything, it's what personifies a piece of literature, and if someone has not found their voice, it doesn't matter how much 'discipline' they have had, it just won't be interesting.

    What does take discipline is the perseverance of keeping oneself motivated to write despite the downfalls a writer is bound to come across, especially in freelance work.
    I didn't mean "discipline" in the sense of "hard work" I meant it in the sense of it sitting next to History, Physics, etc. It's not something you become "skillful" at in the sense that you learn how to tee off with your driver and you learn how to put and once you gather those skills you can go to any golf course in the world and apply them. Writing is a discipline. It's not one of those, "I've mastered the skill, so now I can apply it everywhere" things. Some people write fantastic essays in college but don't know how to communicate effectively through written text in memos/reports, etc.

    It's also a really unique discipline: how do we know centuries upon centuries of history? By written texts. One's ability to communicate in writing facilitates the existence of other disciplines such as history.
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
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  10. #30
    Senior Member StoryOfMyLife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usehername View Post
    I didn't mean "discipline" in the sense of "hard work" I meant it in the sense of it sitting next to History, Physics, etc. It's not something you become "skillful" at in the sense that you learn how to tee off with your driver and you learn how to put and once you gather those skills you can go to any golf course in the world and apply them. Writing is a discipline. It's not one of those, "I've mastered the skill, so now I can apply it everywhere" things. Some people write fantastic essays in college but don't know how to communicate effectively through written text in memos/reports, etc.

    It's also a really unique discipline: how do we know centuries upon centuries of history? By written texts. One's ability to communicate in writing facilitates the existence of other disciplines such as history.
    I see, I understand now...it would help if one would elaborate their meaning to avoid people like me possibly jumping to conclusions
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